Biomedical Textiles for Orthopedic Applications

High-performance biomedical textiles present an exciting opportunity to increase innovation in the orthopedic market and provide less invasive surgical options for patients.

Biomedical Textiles for Orthopedic Applications

High-performance biomedical textiles present an exciting opportunity to increase innovation in the orthopedic market and provide less invasive surgical options for patients.

The design flexibility and shape transformation properties of medical textiles, as well as their compatibility with biologic structures and ability to be tailored to the needs of the particular application, means that patients may benefit from simpler procedures, faster healing times and less risk of complications or rejection.  Braided textiles fabricated using UHMWPE or other high-strength polymeric fibers have long been used as orthopedic sutures to give a surgeon the ability to secure soft and bony tissue using a braid with a low profile and high tensile strength. Now, technology advancements allow for additional design features such as the inclusion of regions of variable density or the ability to branch off, creating a multiaxial structure with a common hub. These advances enable improved handling characteristics, better knot retention, and less mass of implanted material, which can simplify the procedure and facilitate a more durable surgical repair.

Woven and knitted biomedical textile structures can also be an optimal foundation for orthopedic implants and anchor points for attaching soft tissue – largely due to their strength, compliance, and inherent capabilities for promoting tissue ingrowth. These textile structures have the ability to distribute load over a larger surface area and can be engineered to mimic the behavior of the ruptured tendons and ligaments they are intended to replace. The mechanical and biologic properties of textile structures can be tailored for specific uses, such as when intended as regenerative scaffolding or as partially resorbable structures that facilitate healing. This is especially useful in the surgical repairs of tissue that is minimally vascularized, as is commonly seen in joint repair.

Composite scaffolds can be created for tissue engineering applications using hybrids of biologic and synthetic materials. Textile structures created from resorbable synthetics allow cells to infiltrate mesh and support controlled resorption of the polymers aligned with the healing rate of the tissue, resulting in a more complete repair.

Biomedical textiles can be used for less invasive orthopedic procedures including:

  • Bone void applications
  • Joint repair
  • Soft tissue repair (e.g., tendons and ligament tears)
  • Orthopedic sutures
  • Tissue engineering scaffolds
  • Foundations for orthopedic implants and anchor points for attaching soft tissue
  • Hard tissue repair (e.g., spinal stabilization)
  • Composite scaffolds for spinal fusion and long bone fractures
  • Prosthetic ligaments
  • Osteochondral plug
  • Patellar reconstruction
  • Bursa replacement bag/sac
  • Interdigit (toe and finger) spacers
  • Arthritis treatment
  • Shoulder/rotator cuff repair

Key benefits of textiles

  • Less invasive
  • Lower profile
  • Shape transformation (i.e. entering through a small hole and then expanding in the body)
  • High tensile strength
  • Compliance
  • Biocompatibility
  • Inherent capabilities for promoting tissue ingrowth
  • Radial reinforcement and expansion
  • Flexibility
  • Controlled porosity

Medical device OEMs in the highly competitive orthopedic space can distinguish themselves as market leaders by looking to medical textiles to offer minimally invasive approaches for applications ranging from soft tissue tears to bone grafts to spinal stabilization, and more.

Cortland Biomedical is trusted by leading medical device OEMs to enable more innovative, lower profile orthopedic devices by designing and engineering braided, woven and knitted biomedical textiles fit-for-purpose.

The design flexibility and shape transformation properties of medical textiles, as well as their compatibility with biologic structures and ability to be tailored to the needs of the particular application, means that patients may benefit from simpler procedures, faster healing times and less risk of complications or rejection.  Braided textiles fabricated using UHMWPE or other high-strength polymeric fibers have long been used as orthopedic sutures to give a surgeon the ability to secure soft and bony tissue using a braid with a low profile and high tensile strength. Now, technology advancements allow for additional design features such as the inclusion of regions of variable density or the ability to branch off, creating a multiaxial structure with a common hub. These advances enable improved handling characteristics, better knot retention, and less mass of implanted material, which can simplify the procedure and facilitate a more durable surgical repair.

Woven and knitted biomedical textile structures can also be an optimal foundation for orthopedic implants and anchor points for attaching soft tissue – largely due to their strength, compliance, and inherent capabilities for promoting tissue ingrowth. These textile structures have the ability to distribute load over a larger surface area and can be engineered to mimic the behavior of the ruptured tendons and ligaments they are intended to replace. The mechanical and biologic properties of textile structures can be tailored for specific uses, such as when intended as regenerative scaffolding or as partially resorbable structures that facilitate healing. This is especially useful in the surgical repairs of tissue that is minimally vascularized, as is commonly seen in joint repair.

Composite scaffolds can be created for tissue engineering applications using hybrids of biologic and synthetic materials. Textile structures created from resorbable synthetics allow cells to infiltrate mesh and support controlled resorption of the polymers aligned with the healing rate of the tissue, resulting in a more complete repair.

Biomedical textiles can be used for less invasive orthopedic procedures including:

  • Bone void applications
  • Joint repair
  • Soft tissue repair (e.g., tendons and ligament tears)
  • Orthopedic sutures
  • Tissue engineering scaffolds
  • Foundations for orthopedic implants and anchor points for attaching soft tissue
  • Hard tissue repair (e.g., spinal stabilization)
  • Composite scaffolds for spinal fusion and long bone fractures
  • Prosthetic ligaments
  • Osteochondral plug
  • Patellar reconstruction
  • Bursa replacement bag/sac
  • Interdigit (toe and finger) spacers
  • Arthritis treatment
  • Shoulder/rotator cuff repair

Key benefits of textiles

  • Less invasive
  • Lower profile
  • Shape transformation (i.e. entering through a small hole and then expanding in the body)
  • High tensile strength
  • Compliance
  • Biocompatibility
  • Inherent capabilities for promoting tissue ingrowth
  • Radial reinforcement and expansion
  • Flexibility
  • Controlled porosity

Medical device OEMs in the highly competitive orthopedic space can distinguish themselves as market leaders by looking to medical textiles to offer minimally invasive approaches for applications ranging from soft tissue tears to bone grafts to spinal stabilization, and more.

Cortland Biomedical is trusted by leading medical device OEMs to enable more innovative, lower profile orthopedic devices by designing and engineering braided, woven and knitted biomedical textiles fit-for-purpose.

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